Tagged: Opinion piece

The Mind of the Terrorist

Emarat Al-Youm – Abdullah Al-Qamzi

More than a week has passed since the sinful and despicable terrorist attacks which struck the governor’s base in Kandahar in Afghanistan, and which killed a group of our countrymen, who have given the most valuable thing they possessed while extending a helping hand to the needy and the vulnerable, and it is several days since I watched the film ‘Patriot’s Day’, about the terrible terrorist bombing which killed and maimed many during the marathon in the American city of Boston on April 15, 2013.

A friend of mine studying Islamic law told me that if a person arrives at a state of religious intolerance or delusion, then it is very rare that he will return to the right path, and when I thought about his words, I found them to ring true. Examples abound, in more than one Arab country, of religious outcasts who returned to terrorism after rehabilitation programmes. I don’t understand these minds, which justify the killing of civilians in the name of religion, nor do I understand how they can be convinced by the recruiters for terrorist organisations.

Terrorism even rouses them to kill parents! What a bold contradiction to the Holy Qur’anic texts, which urge devotion to the parents. As a result, the equation of Islam with terrorism has become a common idea. This is utterly void, and the religion has suffered from this scourge since the days of the Assassins, and their leader, Hassan-i Sabbah. The idea found popularity among so-called intellectuals influenced by the ideas of European Orientalists, who promoted the idea that Islam is spread by the sword. This false idea is contrary to the tolerance of the religion.

But wherever it strikes, this vicious terrorism is conuterproductive, because its aim is sabotage and destruction and nothing more. If it strikes in Europe or America, it rallies the community with Muslims, and causes the spread of cooperation and solidarity among individuals in the community, and this is the biggest proof of its failure to achieve any goal. And if it strikes in any Muslim country, it has the same effect of solidarity against it, and that is because the killing of man is an ugly crime of a wicked and criminal mind, not justified by religion, nor by ideology, nor by logic.

Terrorism is the devil’s work, and it distinguishes no one, nor does it enhance their political or religious goal. It is a warped tool for killing, for vandalism, and for spreading corruption in the land. Its fate is failure. Human nature is charitable love and its diffusion through the community, help for the downtrodden and the needy, and defence of the oppressed. Islam is a religion of this nature.

To conclude: In the film ‘Die Hard 3’, which explores the subject of terrorism, there is a scene featuring the evacuation of a school in New York because of the presence of a bomb. Police officers discover two boys hiding in a classroom after the evacuation, and a policewoman rushes to rescue them. When she realises that there will not be enough time, she decides to take them to the roof of the school, and embraces them. The scene carries profound weight because she is white, and the two boys are African-American, and this reflects community solidarity, regardless of religion or race, in the face of wretched terrorism. In another scene from the film, the villain reveals that the bomb he placed in an area teeming with children is a decoy, saying “I’m a soldier, not a beast.”

The soldier: Fights to achieve political goals.

The beast (the terrorist): Kills people to wreak havoc.


Translated by Conor Fagan

Original article can be found here.